Monday, May 13, 2013

Breaking My Habit, Day 7: Lesson from Football

Today, I'm going to talk about Football.


Football, Japanese national sport

My friends would know that I'm not a fan of football (or any other sports, actually). The only football match I'd watch is when Indonesia playing against Malaysia (it's my nationalism talking) and when there's a world cup (wouldn't want to miss the euphoria).

I always envy the passion that every football fans share: the raw, aggressive, uncontained spirit to support their team, no matter how strong the opposing team is. People, who in normal situation could not walk hand in hand, suddenly become brother in arms. They become one big family during the football match. It's during these times that our country slogan, Bhinneke Tunggal Ika, can really manifest itself.

But, no, that's not the side of football I wanted to talk about. Today I wanted to talk about the financial management of a football team, especially like the one mentioned here.

In a perfect (or simpler) world, sport would be just sport. Football would mean 11 vs 11 on the field. Every team would be more or less equal, and winning would be determined by the sum of hard work, intelligence, strength, and determination of the 11 players (well, plus their coach) in the team.


It is a world that no longer exist in the modern football. Money is now the language that everybody speaks. Want a better team? Transfer better player: money! Want a healthier team? Hire a dietician: money! Want a stronger team? Buy the latest sports equipment: money! It's hard to play without a strong economic support, especially when the other team are so flamboyant with their spending.


Exhibit A
Exhibit B
Normally, the better your game is, the bigger income you'll get (from advertising, product endorsement, etc). But, just like in real life, financial success is not determined by the income alone. A good financial management is more likely to be the key.

A team that lavishly spend its money to buy overpriced star player is analogues to a man who spend all of his money to buy a new Ferrari. Perhaps the team's performance will be boosted for awhile (just like you'll get happiness from buying a ferrari), but eventually your winning could not keep up with your spending. The player's salary will slowly but surely drain the team's cash (as in the fuel consumption of a Ferrari will drain yours), while you winning is inadequate to cover it (sadly you cannot buy fuel with your happiness). You'll eventually get a negative cash flow. 

Even if you have a LOT of money, it's just a matter of time before you ran out of it. After that, say goodbye to your trophy (or Ferrari, whichever you choose).

Bottom line is, even in sport, financial management is still one of the key factor to determine  a success. Of course you're not trying to manage your football team to become financial success but never won any trophy. But I guess winning the trophy would be very much easier when you have a positive cashflow, and not just a sudden burst of financial boost (Chelsea, City, the clocks are ticking).

You know what would be a nice twist here? If I provide a link to a financial management consultant, and reveal that this post was actually a sponsored article! 

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Nah, I'm not gonna do such a thing, you're saved for tonight 
*wink wink*
See you tomorrow, folks!

P.S: 
Today marks the 7th day of my habit-breaking program. Woohoo, first week brothers and sisters (sodara sodara, I mean). Let's hope I can continue on not snacking / flash gaming until the 40th day!